I’ve been craving egg salad and I’ve been meaning to try no knead peasant bread.  Today was the day.

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I boiled eggs and activated the yeast  simultaneously.

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As you can see, some were super easy to peel, others not so much!  They were all cooked using the same method and peeled using the same method, so I got to wondering why some were easy and others not.  Apparently, the fresher the egg, the harder to peel.  Who knew?  They say to use eggs you’ve had in the fridge for a week or more and to store them on their sides if you are going to hard boil them.  The most recommended method is:  Bring water to a boil.  Turn off heat and cover and let sit 11 minutes.  After boiling, pour off the hot water, shake pan back and forth to crack the shells. Cover eggs in cold water and let set for a couple of minutes. Leave water and eggs in pan and peel, using water to rinse away excess shells.

Peasant Bread was according to a recipe on a website called alexandracooks.com

https://alexandracooks.com/2012/11/07/my-mothers-peasant-bread-the-best-easiest-bread-you-will-ever-make/

Follow the link to a great video and printable recipe.  I wasn’t intimidated because her instructions are so specific.  I made one loaf in a larger bowl than she uses.  You could easily use gluten free flour blends for this!  Everyone loved it.   This is a picture of my dough after the first proof.

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This is how it looked when done.

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I like a simple egg salad, similar in flavor to deviled eggs.  You can certainly add celery or onion in yours, but I love it like this:

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I made a huge batch using 18 eggs.  I’ve scaled the recipe down for a smaller batch.

6 eggs, hardboiled

1 heaping Tbsp. mayonnaise or salad dressing

1 Tbsp. yellow mustard

1/8 tsp. lemon juice

2 Tbsp. pickle relish

Salt and pepper to taste.  I used seasoned salt and a pepper blend.

The brunch was such a success, I will do this again and soon.  So easy and inexpensive!

 

 

 

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